Category Archives: Planning

PLATFORM D: Detroit Station for the Arts



RogueHAA recently participated in the “Detroit Station for the Arts” competition. It was intended to rehabilitate the abandoned Detroit’s central station to transform it into a hybrid building full of life, a center for the Arts. Detroit’s legacy was built on the consummation of art and imagination with technical ingenuity. The foresight and craft of Detroit’s past is resurfacing, and has found its arena. By activating Michigan Central Station, this proposal aims to cultivate an industry which is endemic to the city’s being.

Platform D is envisioned as an adaptive reuse development which converts the vacant train station into a hub of creative production. Hotel and residential units fill the ends of the building, while the central corridors are used for art/innovation studios. The 4th-6th floors are flexible use spaces which can host performances, over-sized installations or exhibits. The façade treatment on this floor is transparent, allowing the spaces’ program to be viewed from the street. The upper floors remain loosely programmed with a restaurant overlooking a garden and plaza along the central corridor. The iconic large arched windows remain without glazing to maintain the magnetism of its current condition. The station’s platforms are repurposed into a plaza which can be adapted to different uses. Modified boxcars can be used as art installation spaces and can be rolled into different locations. The plaza terminates in the return of the Amtrak Station.

A culture of production and creation is known globally as a symbol of Detroit, and has arrived at its new home, on PLATFORM D.

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NSP2 – CONNECTICUT VALUE GUIDE (DOWNLOADS)

 

As part of Capital Access, Inc.’s (CAI) commitment to providing tools that improve the decision making process for Connecticut’s NSP2 Consortium Cities, HAA is proud to have created an Excel based Value Guide.  We believe we have created a tool that when used by managers, developers and construction professionals, will help navigate the myriad of choices that must made when providing energy efficiency and marketability upgrades for NSP2 funded housing.  Because energy and building codes are State based, we’ve now created two versions of the Value Guide.  This new version complies with Connecticut Building and Energy Codes.  It’s designed to be used by managers, developers and construction professionals who work within the State of Connecticut.

The Connecticut Value Guide is designed to:

  • Encourage incorporation of energy efficient and environmentally-friendly design elements.
  • Provide a checklist of design amenities that will maximize marketability.
  • Provide rough construction cost and cost savings information.
  • Provide a single source document for testing alternative design scenarios.
  • Create a marketing brochure for use with potential home buyers. Continue reading
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NSP2 – MICHIGAN VALUE GUIDE (DOWNLOADS)

As part of Capital Access, Inc.’s (CAI) commitment to providing tools that improve the decision making process for Michigan NSP2 Consortium Cities, HAA is proud to have created an Excel based Value Guide.  We believe we have created a tool that when used by managers, developers and construction professionals, will help navigate the myriad of choices that must made when providing energy efficiency and marketability upgrades for NSP2 funded housing.

The Value Guide is designed to:

  • Encourage incorporation of energy efficient and environmentally-friendly design elements.
  • Provide a checklist of design amenities that will maximize marketability.
  • Provide rough construction cost and cost savings information.
  • Provide a single source document for testing alternative design scenarios.
  • Create a marketing brochure for use with potential home buyers. Continue reading
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Detroit Transit, Part 1

 

Whither goest thou, America, in thy shiny car in the night? – Jack Kerouac

Detroit is ironically the most and least likely place to discuss mass transit. Once the home of one of the nation’s most extensive streetcar systems, Detroit has become synonymous with decentralization, suburban expansion, and the dominance of the automobile.  Where human mobility was once limited by the location of rail lines, canals, and the limited travel range of other non-motorized forms of transportation, the car provided a universal form of personal transportation which could be used at virtually any geographic scale. Unfortunately, the success of the car came at the expense of all other modes of transportation, eventually leading Detroit and other cities toward an inefficient and unsustainable transit monoculture.

Recently, infrastructural failures in this country have gained national and international attention. With increasing national imperative, as well as efforts at the regional and local level, it appears mass transit is finally becoming a reality. High-speed rail development in Florida between Tampa, Orlando and Miami, and in California linking Sacramento, San Francisco and L.A., has been covered extensively throughout the media. Portland Oregon’s streetcar system has become a benchmark for urban transit in this country. And the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) has allocated substantial funds to the development of public transit systems, indicating a shift in support and investment toward sustainable car alternatives. As this transition occurs, however, it is important to consider not only the new forms of transportation infrastructure and technology that will be necessary, but also the relationship between these and existing development patterns. Continue reading

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