Category Archives: Architecture

Detroit Design Festival – Celebration of Architecture + Fashion Show

CHROMA – Bridget Sullivan Designs with RogueHAA – Photographer: Lindee Robinson – Model: Chelsey Korte – Hair/MUA: Noel Fischetti

RogueHAA’s collaboration with Bridget Sullivan, a local fashion and textile designer, produced “Chroma,” a design combining tradition and technology with hand-sewn vintage fabrics and 3D printed pieces.  “Chroma” was the finale piece of Sullivan’s latest collection, which was presented at the Detroit Design Festival’s Eastern Market After Dark.  Sullivan and HAA used impressionist color blending, the fluidity of ballet movement, and pleated fabric manipulations to merge dissimilar materials and techniques.

Sullivan and HAA collaborated from the design’s initial concept through fabrication.  They studied sewing techniques, such as smocking and pleating, which provide both rigidity and flexibility to fabric.  Printed modules emulate the flexibility and repetition of smocking and transition into pleats that receive and manipulate the fabric.

Check out more about the AIA fashion show here: Bridget Sullivan Designs

Detroit Design Festival - AIA Celebration of Architecture + Fashion Show

Detroit Design Festival – AIA Celebration of Architecture + Fashion Show

 

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PLATFORM D: Detroit Station for the Arts



RogueHAA recently participated in the “Detroit Station for the Arts” competition. It was intended to rehabilitate the abandoned Detroit’s central station to transform it into a hybrid building full of life, a center for the Arts. Detroit’s legacy was built on the consummation of art and imagination with technical ingenuity. The foresight and craft of Detroit’s past is resurfacing, and has found its arena. By activating Michigan Central Station, this proposal aims to cultivate an industry which is endemic to the city’s being.

Platform D is envisioned as an adaptive reuse development which converts the vacant train station into a hub of creative production. Hotel and residential units fill the ends of the building, while the central corridors are used for art/innovation studios. The 4th-6th floors are flexible use spaces which can host performances, over-sized installations or exhibits. The façade treatment on this floor is transparent, allowing the spaces’ program to be viewed from the street. The upper floors remain loosely programmed with a restaurant overlooking a garden and plaza along the central corridor. The iconic large arched windows remain without glazing to maintain the magnetism of its current condition. The station’s platforms are repurposed into a plaza which can be adapted to different uses. Modified boxcars can be used as art installation spaces and can be rolled into different locations. The plaza terminates in the return of the Amtrak Station.

A culture of production and creation is known globally as a symbol of Detroit, and has arrived at its new home, on PLATFORM D.

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DIFFA: Dining By Design 2014

RogueHAA was proud to participate in the 2014 DIFFA (Design Industries Foundation Fighting AIDS) dining by design event, a non-profit event to raise money and bring awareness to HIV/AIDS. The event was held at the historic Federal Reserve Building at 160 W. Fort St., where guests were invited to participate in three days of activities including a silent art auction, a night of cocktails, and a gala dinner.

Dining by Design brings together a variety of international and local designers to create dining installations that awe, inspire, and delight. Each team was responsible for developing a dining installation that pushed the concept of using basic dining furniture such as tables, table settings, chairs, floors, lighting, including the vignette.

The concept was to define a space within a deconstructed cube using salvaged materials. This concept was reflected in the materials selected by the team – recycled PVC pipes were weaved into a delicate black lattice-patterned vignette. Sequentially, LED lights were strategically placed within the pipes to visually define the space by directing the visitor’s focus through illumination. The dining furniture reinforced the concept through carefully selected pieces.  The dining table was created by Workshop Detroit, who utilized reclaimed wood from vacated Detroit homes.

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POP-UP RETAIL: Cafe con Leche del Este

During the month of October, rogueHAA began work on our latest tactical urbanism strategy, the pop-up initiative – Cafe con Leche del Este.  Cafe con Leche de Este is a community led pop-up coffee shop and event space located within a vacant storefront within the Lafayette Park strip mall. Working with the Detroit Economic Growth Corporation (DEGC), the owners of the Lafayette Shopping Plaza,  the Jefferson East Business Association (JEBA), the Lafayette Park community, and the cafe owners of Cafe con Leche, rogueHAA designed, managed, and constructed the pop-up retail in under four weeks.  The budget was $4000 and included all construction materials, furniture rental, labor, artwork, ceiling and lighting treatments, signage, and interior accessories.  The pop-up cafe and community event space occurred during the entire month of November, hosting multiple movie screenings, lecture events, and gatherings.  In total, over 2,000 people walked through the doors, making this pop-up space the most successful rogueHAA regeneration strategy to date.

More specifically, rogueHAA would like to thank the DEGC and JEBA for helping facilitate the funding, permits, and additional management required to make this project come to fruition. We’d like to thank Franklin Furniture for their generous lending of furniture. Thank you to Patty at Lafayette Foods for brokering the use of the Mies Storefront. Most importantly, we’d like to thank ALL of the community volunteers who either donated materials money or put in countless hours constructing or detailing this community space. And lastly, we have a few individuals who went above and beyond the call of volunteer duty: Cal Navin, Betty Steehler, Jim Griffioen, Sara Woodward, Karen Barney, Jill-Morgan Aubert, Vasco Roma, and Noah Resnick.

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The Perforated Patterns of Lafayette Park – a rogueHAA installation

 

 

 From April 14th – 28th, the “INSIDE LAFAYETTE PARK” exhibition and multi-event design celebration captured an audience of over 1000 design enthusiasts and community members.  This rogueHAA collaborative event was co-curated by The University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture (UDMSOA), Lawrence Technological University (LTU), and Wayne State University, and in conjunction with Preservation Detroit, The Detroit Area Art Deco Society, and the Detroit Creative Corridor Center. 

At the core of the event was an exhibition, comprised of three distinct components of content:

  • PAST: “Black Bottom”, as authored and designed by rogueHAA, showcased the historical significance of the Black Bottom area prior to the Mies’ urban renewal project.  You can download a copy of the Black Bottom display by clicking here
  • PRESENT: “The Settlement Shape” as authored by The school of architecture at the Milan Polytechnic.  This traveling exhibition showcased the culmination of ten years of research and documentation on Detroit’s Lafayette Park.  This exhibition utilized models, drawings and photographs to trace the history and theories of Ludwig  Mies van der Rohe’s, Ludwig Hilbersheimer’s, and Alfred Caldwell’s visionary design.  Having spent the last year touring some of the major universities in Europe,  Kent State, and then Detroit, the exhibition will be displayed next at Chicago’s IIT campus.
  • FUTURE: “Thanks For the View Mr Mies” as authored by Danielle Aubert, Lana Carver, and Natasha Chandani.  This portion of the exhibition included content, photos, and ephemera resulting from their soon-to-be-published book looking inside the lives of the Lafayette Park residents.  30 Corine Vermeulen photographs were included in this portion of the exhibition.

In addition to the creation of the Black Bottom exhibition, rogueHAA was responsible for the exhibition layout and design.  Continue reading

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DRIWR LANDSCAPE URBANISM PROJECT PUBLISHED IN TOPOS

PROJECT.  The Detroit Wildlife Refuge project has been published in the April edition of TOPOS magazine.

CONCEPT. Landscape Urbanism advocates a purposeful discourse between ecological systems, human activities, and the post-industrial landscape, ultimately manifesting in the deliberate celebration of the urban void. This celebration glorifies the interstitial, so that the void is inevitably romanticized by, and is necessary to, the burgeoning Landscape Urbanism profession. Reliance on the void introduces a basic set of dilemmas: In order to focus on the space between buildings, there must be buildings; planning creative programming between infrastructural systems requires existing infrastructure; implementing a proposed hybrid ecology between urban eco-systems and human eco-systems requires human eco-systems. All of these very specific examples result in a single common statement: In order to have an urban void, there first needs to be an urban, or rather a recognizable urban density. Continue reading

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Detroit Transit, Part 1

 

Whither goest thou, America, in thy shiny car in the night? – Jack Kerouac

Detroit is ironically the most and least likely place to discuss mass transit. Once the home of one of the nation’s most extensive streetcar systems, Detroit has become synonymous with decentralization, suburban expansion, and the dominance of the automobile.  Where human mobility was once limited by the location of rail lines, canals, and the limited travel range of other non-motorized forms of transportation, the car provided a universal form of personal transportation which could be used at virtually any geographic scale. Unfortunately, the success of the car came at the expense of all other modes of transportation, eventually leading Detroit and other cities toward an inefficient and unsustainable transit monoculture.

Recently, infrastructural failures in this country have gained national and international attention. With increasing national imperative, as well as efforts at the regional and local level, it appears mass transit is finally becoming a reality. High-speed rail development in Florida between Tampa, Orlando and Miami, and in California linking Sacramento, San Francisco and L.A., has been covered extensively throughout the media. Portland Oregon’s streetcar system has become a benchmark for urban transit in this country. And the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) has allocated substantial funds to the development of public transit systems, indicating a shift in support and investment toward sustainable car alternatives. As this transition occurs, however, it is important to consider not only the new forms of transportation infrastructure and technology that will be necessary, but also the relationship between these and existing development patterns. Continue reading

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