Category Archives: Lectures

The Accidental Playground: A Talk with Daniel Campo

Daniel Campo Lecture (2)

The Accidental Playground explores the remarkable landscape created by individuals and small groups who occupied and rebuilt an abandoned Brooklyn waterfront. While local residents, activists, garbage haulers, real estate developers, speculators, and two city administrations fought over the fate of the former Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal (BEDT), others simply took to this decaying edge, transforming it into a unique venue for leisure, creative, and everyday practices. These occupiers and do-it-yourself builders created their own waterfront parks and civic spaces absent every resource needed for successful urban development, including plans, designs, capital, professional assistance, consensus, and permission from the waterfront’s owners. Amid trash, ruins, weeds, homeless encampments, and the operation of an active garbage transfer station, they inadvertently created the “Brooklyn Riviera” and made this waterfront a destination that offered much more than its panoramic vistas of the Manhattan skyline. The terminal evolved into the home turf for unusual and sometimes spectacular recreational, social, and creative subcultures, including the skateboarders who built a short-lived but nationally renowned skatepark, a twenty-five-piece “public” marching band, fire performance troupes, artists, photographers, and filmmakers. At the same time it served the basic recreational needs of local residents. Collapsing piers became great places to catch fish, sunbathe, or take in the views; the foundation of a demolished warehouse became an ideal place to picnic, practice music, or do an art project; rubble-strewn earth became a compelling setting for film and fashion shoots; a broken bulkhead became a beach; and thick patches of weeds dotted by ailanthus trees became a jungle. These reclamations, all but ignored by city and state governments and property interests that were set to transform this waterfront, momentarily added to the distinctive cultural landscape of the city’s most bohemian and rapidly changing neighborhood.

Drawing on a rich mix of documentary strategies, including observation, ethnography, photography, and first-person narrative, Daniel Campo probes this accidental playground, allowing those who created it to share and examine their own narratives, perspectives, and conflicts. The multiple constituencies of this waterfront were surprisingly diverse, their stories colorful and provocative. When taken together, Campo argues, they suggest a radical reimagining of urban parks and public spaces, and the practices by which they are created and maintained.

The Accidental Playground, which treats readers to an utterly compelling story, is an exciting and distinctive contribution to the growing literature on unplanned spaces and practices in cities today.

RSVP HERE

archiCULTURAL SHIFT Panel Discussion + Exhibition

 

 

 

 

 

Last weekend, rogueHAA was pleased to present The archiCULTURAL SHIFT, the last panel discussion in its Provocations: Challenging Detroit’s Design Discourse series. Held in the MIES Storefront at Lafayette Park, this event was part of the Detroit Creative Corridor Center’s Detroit Design Festival 2012.  ArchiCULTURAL panelists discussed how their roles, theories, and work have been affected by our society becoming increasingly information and time-centric. We would like to thank our panelists for their expertise and participation in this event: Continue reading

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THANKS FOR THE VIEW, MR MIES: LAFAYETTE PARK DETROIT

Placement is pleased to announce that “THANKS FOR THE VIEW, MR. MIES” is finally available in print.  “Thanks For the View Mr Mies” is authored by Danielle Aubert, Lana Carver, and Natasha Chandani.  As previously displayed within the MIES Storefront space during the INSIDE LAFAYETTE PARK exhibition, the book includes photos, essays, and ephemera that look inside the lives of the current Lafayette Park residents.  The book is published by Metropolis Books, distributed by D.A.P., and will soon be available in all major bookstores around USA and Europe. Pre-orders on Amazon.

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the ArchiCULTURAL SHIFT – Panel Discussion, SPACEBUSTER by Raumlabor Installation, and Exhibition for Detroit Design Festival

rogueHAA is pleased to announce their next event, The archiCULTURAL SHIFT.  As an integral component to the Detroit Design Festival, this event is comprised of an exhibition, panel discussion, and SPACEBUSTER by Raumlabor installation.  All components seek to address the following issues and aim to foster creative relationships between the architectural and informational technology design communities.

Historically, architecture has been understood, practiced, and theorized as the discipline of space – the designed manipulation and configuration of form, material and structure.  Evolving throughout the millennia, architecture has also been employed to identify and solve social conditions through the use of materials and spatial arrangements. 

In the last few decades, numerous design and architectural critics and theorists have identified cultural shifts within technological societies – from space-centered institutions to time-centered institutions, from material-based economies to information-based economies.

The expansion of publicly available information and the compression of time have affected all design practices, but none more so than the architectural profession.  Compared with other design fields, the prevalent architectural process – project creation, conceptual design, design development, construction documentation, permitting, construction coordination – appears extremely sluggish.  As practicing professionals, we have taken notice.  More importantly, the public and our clients have taken notice.  Our society continues to desire results in shorter amounts of time, often to the detriment of the design process and final product.  As our technological culture continues to shift toward accelerated means of production, will The Architect, one who practices a traditional space-based profession, become increasingly minimized?  Has the Architecture-of-Space become temporal, immaterial, and marginalized?  How can Architecture infiltrate the current information-driven social conditions prevalent within today’s society?  Are we on the precipice of an archiCULTURAL SHIFT?

All events will occur at The MIES Storefront,  1565 East Lafayette, Detroit.
A breakdown of the three day event is as follows: Continue reading

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rogueHAA HOSTS “ART AND DEVELOPMENT IN DETROIT” – A PANEL DISCUSSION FOR MICROFEST DETROIT

 rogueHAA is pleased to announce the next event in its 2011-2012 panel discussion series: “Provocations: Challenging Detroit’s Design Discourse”

“ART, THE AVANT GARDE, AND THE REALITIES OF RESURRECTING AN AMERICAN CITY”
August 17, 2012
Panel Discussion: 7pm-9pm
Reception to follow
Art Effect Gallery
1420 E Fisher Freeway, Eastern Market, Detroit

ART, THE AVANT GARDE, AND THE REALITIES.  Historically, the role of art within the development of revitalization of cities can be seen cynically as one of unwitting accomplice to gentrification and complicit partner to the exploitation of creative capacity.  In this interpretation, art exists only for a moment as a noble avant garde, free of encumbrances before becoming instrumentalized by the very elements it sought to move beyond.  From past examples such as the South of Houston district in Manhattan (SOHO) and Southwark in London, to contemporary illustrations in places like Over-the-Rhine in Cincinnati, a leading edge of artists and other creative types begins to give way to something potentially more banal than the squalor and disinvestment that had previously existed.  This is a story we all know very well.

But what if art and other creative forces in Detroit could overcome this seemingly predetermined path?  Could the enormity of Detroit’s challenges, its collective resolve to address them, and its uniquely integrated blend of artists, designers, and allied professionals bridge a gulf that has contributed to the “punch line” results that emerged previously.  How might these groups actually leverage the knowledge base of one another to effect change, retain the integrity of their intellectual projects, and create a new model for collaboration that contradicts the implicit Darwinistic growth regime model so many attribute to “revitalization” in a capitalist economy?

To discuss these issues within the relationship between art, culture, design, and the revitalization of Detroit, we have convened a panel with diverse backgrounds and perspectives:

Philip Lauri – Detroit Lives!
Mike Han – Street Culture Mash
Jela Ellefson – Eastern Market
Oya Amakisi – Film, US Social Forum
Dan Kinkead – Moderator, rogueHAA Continue reading

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